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Almond Flour Gingerbread Cookies {Vegan, Oil-Free & Grain-Free}

Old-fashioned, yet modern, almond flour gingerbread cookies !  They taste like homestyle favorites, but are grain-free, gluten-free & vegan, plus they are incredibly easy to make! They are perfect for gift-giving, or for keeping on hand all season long.

overhead shot of a small, blue-gray plate of almond flour gingerbread cookies

‘Tis the season to make gingerbread cookies!

These lovelies are a riff on my 3-ingredient Almond Flour Cookies. They are packed with ginger & spice goodness, plus the distinctive flavor of molasses, which makes any kind of gingerbread sing.

These cookies have are soft, but also have some chewiness. They are pretty amazing, if I do say so myself. They are also:

  • Made with a limited number of readily available ingredients
  • Vegan (dairy -free & egg-free)
  • Grain-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Oil-free

Yes, please!

 stack of 3 almond flour ginger molasses cookies

Easy Dough, Easy Cookies

The dough is as easy as my other almond flour cookies, although it might take up to 2 minutes (instead of 1 minute) to prepare them, since measuring the molasses is, well, as slow as molasses :).

Sweeten Cookies with (a Small Amount) of Molasses & Coconut Sugar

I used a combination of coconut sugar and molasses to sweeten the cookies. I have some options for substitutes: brown sugar in place of coconut sugar, and maple syrup in place of molasses, in case you want a lighter flavor gingerbread.  Keep in mind that venturing beyond the suggested substitutes will most likely lead to very different results, so experiment with caution!

I tried making these with all molasses (ugh, far too strong), part molasses & part maple (close, but still not right), but finally got it right with a sugar-molasses combo.

Specifically, I used 2-1/2 tablespoons coconut sugar and 2-1/2 teaspoons molasses. The dough is dark and thick, but still moist:

cookie dough for almond flour ginger molasses cookies in a blue bowl

Sprinkle with Raw Sugar, or Leave Plain

You can scoop these directly onto a cookie sheet, or you can dip/sprinkle in turbinado (raw) sugar for some added sparkle. If you cannot decide, follow my lead and do some with and some without.

One of the many beauties of egg-free baking is that recipes can be scaled small, (this recipe yields 10 cookies) or easily multiplied into larger batches without  issues. The dough is so easy, you could just mix a new portion with each tray of cookies.

Let’s face it, you’re going to want another batch.

Here’s a side-by side of the sugar-coated and plain cookies. My son actually preferred the plain. A tiny Christmas miracle!

Keeping with gingerbread tradition, these cookies continue to taste wonderful–in both taste and texture–after several days at room temperature.

Happy holiday baking!

almond flour gingerbread cookies with a bite taken out of it.

More Grain-Free & Vegan Almond Flour Cookies to Try:

3-Ingredient Almond Flour Cookies

3-Ingredient Banana Almond Flour Cookies

4-Ingredient Chocolate Almond Flour Cookies

3-Ingredient Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies

Pumpkin Almond Flour Cookies

Sweet Potato Almond Flour Cookies

3-Ingredient Fresh Apple Almond Flour Cookies

Yield: 10 cookies

Almond Flour Gingerbread Cookies {Vegan, Oil-Free & Grain-Free}

Almond Flour Gingerbread Cookies {Vegan, Oil-Free & Grain-Free}

Old-fashioned gingerbread cookies with a modern makeup! They taste like homestyle favorites, but are grain-free, gluten-free & vegan, plus they are incredibly easy to make! They are perfect for gift-giving, or for keeping on hand all season long.

Prep Time 3 minutes
Cook Time 16 minutes
Total Time 19 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup blanched almond flour (not almond meal)
  • 2 and 1/2 tablespoons coconut sugar
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • pinch of ground cloves
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 and 1/2 teaspoons dark molasses
  • Optional: Turbinado (raw) sugar for sprinkling on cookies before baking

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk the almond flour, coconut sugar, ginger, cinnamon, baking powder, salt and cloves. Add the water and molasses, stirring until completely blended.
  3. Drop by rounded tablespoons (I used a small cookie scoop) on the prepared baking sheet, spacing 2 inches apart. If desired, sprinkle cookies with turbinado (raw) sugar.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 13 to 16 minutes until surface of cookies appears dry and they are set at the centers.
  5. Remove from the oven and cool for 2 minutes on the baking sheet. Transfer cookies to a cooling rack and cool completely.

Notes

Storage: Store the cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for 4 days (in a cool room; if it is hot, store in the refrigerator), the refrigerator for 1 week or the freezer for up to 6 months.

Sugar Options: (1) An equal amount of packed brown sugar can be used in place of the coconut sugar; (2) For a lighter-flavored cookie, an equal amount of maple syrup (or honey, if not vegan) can be used in place of the molasses.

Nutrition Information

Serving Size

1 cookie

Amount Per Serving Calories 81Total Fat 5.6gSaturated Fat 0.4gCholesterol 0mgSodium 54.1mgCarbohydrates 6.9gFiber 1.3gSugar 4.6gProtein 2.4g

Did you make this recipe?

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Jin

Thursday 17th of June 2021

Perfection!

Camilla

Thursday 17th of June 2021

Aww, thanks so much, Jin!

Ruth Moorhead

Tuesday 5th of January 2021

I don't eat sugar or molasses, so I'll be trying this with a no-sugar-added balsamic vinegar reduction as a substitute. I've read that it works well for gingerbread flavor. Wish me luck!

Ru Moorhead

Tuesday 5th of January 2021

I don't eat sugar or molasses, so I'll be trying this with a no-sugar-added balsamic vinegar reduction as a substitute. I've read that it works well for gingerbread flavor. Wish me luck!

Sorcha

Friday 6th of November 2020

Wonderful recipe! Gives me a use for the almond flour I have had on hand for a while, and I love that it is so low in sugar. I did use regular brown sugar, but I used only 1 Tbsp. and they came out great. I would love to make a batch for myself later that uses only the molasses, since I personally can handle dark flavours and also don't need a lot of sweet. The almonds give enough sweetness on their own, in my opinion. Thanks for this recipe!

Camilla

Monday 7th of December 2020

So very welcome, Sorcha!

Pongodhall

Thursday 4th of June 2020

I can't get the blanched almond flour at all. Why do you stress it must be that not almond flour? I'd love to make a few almond flour things.

Tina

Wednesday 7th of October 2020

I have made these with unbalanced almond flour (not almond meal), and they came out perfectly delicious! When making finer pastries, fine blanched almond flour makes a bigger difference.

Camilla

Thursday 4th of June 2020

Hi Pongodhall, I am sorry this is a problem. Are you outside of North America? It may be that blanched almond flour is labeled differently in other countries.

I specify blanched almond flour because it is made with blanched almonds (that is, the dark skins are removed before grinding into a flour). It is the common variety of almond flour in the U.S. Almond flour is similar but it is made from raw almonds that still have their skins on. It tends to be less finely ground, too. As such, it is heavier and can yield different results in baked goods. You can usually tell the difference between the two by sight: the blanched almond flour is pale in color, almond meal is darker and coarser. It's a bit like the difference between whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour. You can often sub one for the other, but some almond flour recipes just don't work as well with almond meal (especially breads).

If the almond flour that you have available is finely ground, but still has skins on, I am sure that you can still use it! Or it might just be labeled "almond flour" without specifically saying "blanched." I hope this helps.

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