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Easy Millet Flax Tortillas (V, GF, oil-free)

Easy millet flax tortillas are a vegan, oil-free, and gluten-free alternative to traditional corn or wheat tortillas! Made with 2 ingredients, they have a wholesome texture and faint corn flavor that works for all of your tortillas needs.

a stack of millet tortillas on a copper cooling rack

My love of millet grows with each new recipe, and these easy Millet Flax Tortillas are no exception. They are delicious with everything, and with the addition of a healthy measure of flaxseed meal, they are also flexible (a big deal— all-millet flatbreads are not).

My hope is that i can convince you, too, of the wonders of millet.

Millet is versatile, inexpensive, mild in flavor, and tasty in so many recipes. It is a low-glycemic food (= no extreme spikes in blood sugar levels after eating it), plus rich in dietary fiber (both soluble and insoluble fiber = great for digestive health). A total hero ingredient!

Get ready to love it in these easy tortillas.

overhead shot of millet tortillas on a cooling rack, with the top tortilla rolled up

Recipe Benefits

These wholesome tortillas are nourishing, satisfying, and all of the following, too:

  • Vegan (no eggs, no dairy)
  • Oil-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Made with 2 ingredients (plus water and optional salt)
  • Frugal
  • Sugar-free
  • No special equipment needed
  • No tortilla-making experience required!

Ingredients for Easy Millet Flax Tortillas

overhead shot of two glass bowls, one filled with millet flour and one filled with flaxseed meal

Millet flour and flaxseed meal are the only two ingredients, besides tap water, needed to make the tortillas. Salt can be added (I like to add a small amount), but it is not required.

Tip: Grind Your Own Flour

If you have a high-speed blender, or a small electric coffee grinder, you can grind your own flour from whole millet in little time.

High speed blenders will turn millet into millet flour in about a minute. If using a coffee grinder, you will need to grind about 1/4 cup at a time (it goes quickly). Place any extra flour in an airtight bag or container and freeze until next time.

Alas, food processors do not work for grinding whole millet into fine flour (I’ve tried, and tried again). The tiny millet grains are hard (and tenacious!), making it difficult to get anything finer than a coarse meal after 10 minutes of grinding.

Any Substitutions for Millet Flour or Flaxseed meal

It is hard to predict how this recipe will work with other flours without trying it. I have only used these proportions with millet flour, but you are welcome to experiment!

Flaxseed meal binds the tortillas and makes them flexible. Tortillas made with nothing but millet flour are brittle and will crack using this method pf preparation. An equal amount of chia seed meal should work as a substitute.

Whole psyllium husks should also work. I suggest using three tablespoons of whole psyllium husks in place of the 1/4 cup of flaxseed meal.

Step by Step Directions

Step 1: Mix the Dough 

First, whisk the millet flour, flaxseed meal, and (optional) salt in a small mixing bowl until blended.

Next, add the water to the bowl of dry ingredients, stirring until completely blended. Let the dough stand for about 5 minutes so that the flaxseed meal and millet flour can fully absorb the water. The mixture will quickly come together into a thick dough.

Gather the dough together (I use my hands) in the center of the bowl.

Note: If using regular flaxseed meal (instead of golden flaxseed meal, as I have used in these) photos, the tortillas will be darker in color.

4 photo collage showing how to make millet tortilla dough

Step 2: Divide the Dough

Shape the millet dough into an even disk or ball. Do not worry about overworking the dough or mishandling it in some other way. It is a durable dough and can be reshaped as many times as needed.

Place the dough disk onto a cutting board and cut into 5 equal pieces. You can also break it off into 5 equal pieces (whichever you find easier).

tortilla dough on a white plate, cut into 5 wedges

Step 3: Shape the Dough

Roll each piece into a ball. Next, place one of the balls between two sheets of plastic wrap, parchment paper or wax paper. Plastic wrap is definitely the best choice (by far) for removing the dough after rolling or pressing.

Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a circle that measures 6 inches (15 cm) across. Perfection is not required, especially after the initial rolling. Simply pinch off pieces of dough from one place and press them into another, as needed. 

I do not recommend rolling this portion (1/5) of the dough any larger than 6 inches. It will become too thin to remove from the parchment paper and will likely tear during the cooking process. See my notes at the end for making larger tortillas.

4 photo collage sowing how to roll out a tortilla

Alternative Methods for Flattening the Tortilla Dough

No rolling pin? No problem. A large (still filled) can or wine bottle can take its place.

If you have a tortilla press, use it! It will work perfectly to press these evenly and efficiently. You will still want to use plastic wrap, wax paper or parchment paper to prevent sticking. 

2 photo collage showing alternative ways to press out a tortilla

You can also use your fingers and palm to press the dough. Press out the dough into a rough circle (do still place the dough between sheets of wax paper pr parchment paper).

So long as the tortilla is relatively thin, in same way shape or form, you are going to have great tortillas.

Tips for Removing the Paper from the Tortillas

Once the tortilla is rolled out, carefully peel off the top layer of paper. If a few pieces of dough stick to the plastic or paper, simply repress them into the tortilla.

The dough becomes stickier as it gets warmer, so if the paper is really sticking, place the tortilla (in its paper) in the freezer for 3 or 4 minutes (not much longer). The tortilla will come off with ease! 

Step 4: Cook the Tortillas.

I recommend using a nonstick skillet, or a very well seasoned case iron pan (one that works as nonstick for you), for cooking the tortillas. 

Place the tortilla, dough side down, into the hot skillet and peel off the remaining piece of paper. Turn the heat up to medium.

4 photo collage showing how to cook a millet flax tortilla

Cook the tortilla for 2 to 4 minutes (it will bubble up, a little bit, in a few places— not in a dramatic way, though). Slide a spatula underneath and lift the tortilla slightly to check that it can release without sticking (i.e., the bottom side is cooked).

Once you have determined that the tortilla is not sticking, flip the tortilla over. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes longer until the other side is dry and slightly darker. Notethat these tortillas do not brown a lot.

Transfer the tortilla to a cooling rack to cool and repeat with the remaining pieces of dough.

Millet tortillas, done!

Use as you Would Any Tortilla or Flatbread

Use the tortillas for tacos, burritos, quesadillas, or for scooping up beans, salsa, guacamole, stews, curries, and vegetables.

The tortillas can also be used for making sandwiches, wraps, and so much more. They are a a bit rustic and hearty to be used for dessert (e.g., as a substitute for crepes). Then again, that has not stopped me from smearing them with chocolate hazelnut spread 😊.

As mentioned earlier, these tortillas are flexible! You can roll them:

a rolled millet tortilla atop a stack of more millet tortilla

Fold in half:

a stack of millet tortillas on a copper cooling rack

Or quarter them:

a millet tortilla, folded into quarters and held in a person's fingertips

Happy eating!

FAQ

How Should I Store the Tortillas?

Store the cooled tortillas in an airtight container at cool room temperature for 2 days, the refrigerator for 2 weeks or the freezer for up to 6 months.

My Dough Is Too Dry/Moist. What Should I Do?

This is very flexible recipe in more ways than one. If the dough feels too dry, simply add a little bit more water. Conversely, if the dough is too wet, add a bit more flaxseed meal ( mostly flaxseed meal, perhaps a pinch more millet flour) so that the dough is moist but not wet.

Can I Make Large Millet Flax Tortillas?

Yes! You can divide this quantity of dough in half (to roll 10-inch tortillas) or into thirds (to roll 8-inch tortillas). Use a large nonstick skillet and use extra care when turning/flipping the tortillas because of the larger size.

Can I Make the Dough Ahead of Time?

Absolutely! The dough can be made and stored–in an airtight container in the refrigerator–for up to 1 week. 

More Grain-Free & Vegan Tortillas to Love:

Yield: 5 tortillas

Millet Flax Tortillas (V, GF, Oil-Free)

a stack of millet tortillas on a copper cooling rack

Millet flax tortillas are a vegan, oil-free, and gluten-free alternative to traditional corn or wheat tortillas! Made with 2 ingredients, they have a wholesome texture and faint corn flavor that works for all of your tortillas needs.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup millet flour
  • 1/3 cup flaxseed meal
  • 3/4 cup water
  • Optional: 1/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

    1. In a small mixing bowl, whisk the millet flour, flaxseed meal, and (optional) salt, until blended.
    2. Add the water to the bowl, stirring until combined. Let stand 5 minutes to thicken and then shape dough into a ball (it will feel firm and moist, but not wet. Add more flaxseed meal if too wet; add a bit more water if too dry).
    3. Cut, or otherwise divide, the dough into 5 equal pieces. Shape each piece of dough into a ball.
    4. Place one dough ball between two large pieces of plastic wrap, wax paper or parchment paper. Using a rolling pin or tortilla press, roll or press into a 6-inch (15 cm) circle. Carefully peel off top layer of plastic wrap or paper.
    5. Place tortilla, dough side down, into nonstick skillet and carefully peel off second piece of wrap/paper.
    6. Cook the tortilla for 2 to 4 minutes until it bubbles up a little bit in a few places and releases easily when lifted with a spatula. Flip the tortilla and cook the other side for 1 to 2 minutes longer.
    7. Transfer tortilla to a metal cooling rack and repeat with remaining pieces of dough.
    8. The tortillas are delicious warm, room temperature, or cold.

Notes

Storage: Store the cooled tortillas in an airtight container at cool room temperature for 2 days, the refrigerator for 2 weeks or the freezer for up to 6 months.

Grind Your Own Millet Flour: a high speed blenders will turn millet into millet flour in about a minute. If using a coffee grinder, you will need to grind about 1/4 cup at a time (it goes quickly). Place any extra flour in an airtight bag or container and freeze until next time. Unfortunately, food processors do not work for grinding whole millet into fine flour.

Nutrition Information

Yield

5

Serving Size

1

Amount Per Serving Calories 105Total Fat 4gSaturated Fat 0gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 3gCholesterol 0mgSodium 4mgCarbohydrates 15gFiber 2gSugar 0gProtein 3g

The nutritional information is provided as a courtesy and is an estimate only. This information comes from online calculators. Although powerhungry.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures are only estimates. Varying factors such as product types or brands and optional ingredients can change the nutritional information in any given recipe.

Did you make this recipe?

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Sandra

Thursday 8th of September 2022

These are wonderful! Perfect for Taco night, I made your lentil taco meat and it was a fantastic meal!!!

Camilla

Thursday 8th of September 2022

I am so glad you like the tortillas, and the lentil taco meat, Sandra!

Janice

Wednesday 7th of September 2022

I have millet but not millet flour. Assume I can process millet to flour like I do with oatmeal.

Camilla

Wednesday 7th of September 2022

Hi Janice! Thanks for bringing that up, Yes, you can definitely make your own millet flour from whole millet. I have added tips for doing so in the post as well as the recipe card.

Melody

Tuesday 6th of September 2022

Maybe a typo. If the dough is too WET, add flax??

“ If the dough feel too dry, simply add a little bit more water. Conversely, if the dough is too dry, add a bit more flaxseed meal”

Camilla

Wednesday 7th of September 2022

Hi Melody! Thank you for catching that--oy vey, I must have needed more caffeine. Much appreciated, I have corrected the phrase (should be if dough is too WET, add more flaxseed meal).

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