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Easy Vegan Gluten-Free Amaranth Tortillas (Oil-Free)

Easy vegan gluten-free amaranth tortillas are the gluten-free tortillas you have been searching for! This easy recipe for homemade tortillas is also oil-free, nut-free, seed-free, and gluten-free. No rolling pin required!

stack of amaranth tortillas

I am always grateful for suggestions for new recipes–this post is a case in point!

A few months back, I published an oven-baked Amaranth Flatbread. A reader let me know that she tried it and like it, but…did I have an equally simple recipe for amaranth tortillas?

I did not. Until now!

What is Amaranth?

a small white bowl filled with uncooked amaranth grains

Amaranth is a teeny-tiny ancient grain (or, more precisely, a pseudocereal) that is native to Peru. It was a major food crop of the Aztecs and is loaded with calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins.

It shares many of the same features of quinoa, most notably that it is also considered a complete plant protein, boasting all of the essential amino acids. Amaranth is particularly abundant in lysine, an essential amino acid missing from most grains.

Amaranth also has a mild, nutty flavor that is easy to love.

Recipe Features

These easy amaranth tortillas are healthy, versatile, delicious, satisfying, and all of the following, too:

  • Vegan (no eggs, no dairy)
  • Gluten-free
  • Oil-free
  • Nut-free
  • Seed-free
  • Sugar-free
  • No rolling pin required
  • Made without additional flours or starches (such as rice flour, tapioca flour, or cornstarch)

Ingredients for the Amaranth Tortillas

The exact amounts of each ingredient are indicated in the recipe card at the end of the post.

overhead phot of two bowls, one filled with amaranth grain and the other with amaranth flour

You only need simple ingredients for these easy tortillas:

  • Amaranth flour
  • Water (I use filtered tap water)
  • Optional salt (table salt or sea salt)

Option: Grind Your Own Amaranth Flour

If you have whole grain amaranth on hand, you can easily grind it in a high speed blender in about one minute. I also have instructions for using whole grain amaranth without grinding it separately into a flour. The instructions are in the recipe card below.

I like to add a little bit of salt to the batter to enhance the flavor of the tortillas. You can also add flavorings, such as garlic powder, onion powder, herbs, or spices, such ground cumin.

Any Substitutions for Amaranth Flour?

Yes! You can use an equal amount of quinoa flour to make 1 ingredient quinoa tortillas.

Alternative flours, such as millet flour, rice flour, teff flour will not work 1:1 for the amaranth flour. However, I have many other tortilla recipes on my site to choose from.

Here are some options, or type type “tortilla” into the search box for many more.

Step by Step Directions

Note that the complete directions are also in the recipe card below.

Step 1: Whisk the Batter

In a medium bowl, whisk the dry ingredients: amaranth flour, (optional) salt, and any other (optional) flavorings (e.g., garlic powder, or sweet or savory spices).

Add the water, whisking with a wire whisk until completely blended. Let the batter stand for two to three minutes before proceeding. This allows the flour to be fully hydrated before cooking.

glass bowl and whisk with amaranth tortilla batter

The batter should be the consistency of a thin pancake batter— not too thin, not too thick— to make tortillas that are akin to traditional flour tortillas.

Thinner batter will still work (the results will be more like crepes). Thicker batter will be more difficult to spread, so add a small amount of extra water (a little at a time), as needed.

Step 2: Cook the Tortillas

Heat a medium size nonstick skillet over medium heat until just hot. Note: It is important to use a nonstick skillet or the tortillas will stick.

Add about 1/4 cup of batter to the heated skillet. Working quickly, tilt the skillet so that the batter evenly covers the bottom of the pan.

amaranth tortilla batter getting poured onto a nonstick skillet

Increase the heat to medium high heat and cook the tortilla for 1 to 2 minutes (it may bubble and puff slightly in a few places).

Once the edges are light golden brown and the surface appears cooked/dry, slide a spatula underneath and flip over. Cook for about 1 minute longer until the other side is set.

amaranth tortilla getting flipped in a nonstick skillet

The tortillas will often have a few dark spots–typical of tortillas. It is a good thing!

Step Three: Cool

Transfer the tortilla to a cooling rack to cool and repeat with the remaining batter.

That’s it!

Use Amaranth Tortillas as You Would Flour Tortillas

You will love using these tortillas in all of the expected ways, including wraps, tacos, burritos, quesadillas, or scooping up black beans, salsa, guacamole, or any other foods you wish to scoop into your mouth.

Here are some favorite fillings:

SERVING

You can serve these quinoa tortillas with any sweet or savory filling.

Sweet fillings that we love are:

The tortillas are flexible (especially when warm or room temperature), which means they can be rolled or folded without breaking.

close up of several rolled amaranth tortillas on a white plate

Happy eating!

FAQ

Storage

The amaranth tortillas are at their very best shortly after being made. However, they keep well, too. Store the tortillas in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or the freezer for up to 6 months.

To prevent sticking during storage, I suggest layering the tortillas between pieces of wax paper or parchment paper.

What is the Flavor of Amaranth Tortillas?

Amaranth has a mild, neutral flavor, which means that these tortillas likewise have a mild, slightly nutty flavor.

How Should I Serve Amaranth Tortillas?

Why is My Batter So Thick? I Followed the Recipe!

The answer is measurement.

Using a digital kitchen scale (they are inexpensive) to measure ingredients will generate accurate and consistent results, especially with recipes that call for alternative flours.

For example, 1 cup of chickpea can vary dramatically (e.g, 100 grams to 180 grams), depending on how it is packed or spooned into the measuring cup. But 120 grams of chickpea flour is always 120 grams of chickpea flour (the same is true for measuring the tapioca flour).

Can I Make Large Tortillas?

Yes! Use a large skillet and more batter per tortilla (1/3 to 1/2 cup of batter per tortilla), spreading the batter into a larger circle. Use extra care when turning/flipping the tortillas.

Can I Use Whole Amaranth Grain?

Yes. You will need to use an equal weight (140 grams) of uncooked amaranth grains. This is about 3/4 cup, plus 1 teaspoon, of grains. These are the options for making the tortillas:

  1. Grind the amaranth into a flour. Grind an equal weight of the uncooked amaranth in a high speed blender or coffee milll until it is a fine flour. Use in the recipe as directed.
  2. Soak and blend the amaranth. Soak an equal weight of whole grain amaranth in boiling water for 15 minutes, or room temperature water for 3 hours. Drain through a fine mesh sieve. Combine the soaked amaranth with 1 cup water in a blender and blend until completely smooth.

My Tortillas are not Super Flexible. Why?

It is most likely that the tortillas were left to cook for too long and have dried out. The next time you make a batch, only cook the tortillas until they are just set.

Happy cooking!

Related Recipes

a stack of amaranth tortillas on a gray background

Easy Vegan Gluten-Free Amaranth Tortillas (Oil-Free)

Yield: 6 tortillas
Prep Time: 3 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (140 g) amaranth flour (see notes for options)
  • 1 cup (237 mL) water
  • Optional: 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • See notes for adding other flavorings

Instructions

  1. Whisk the amaranth flour and (optional) salt, as well as any optional flavoring, in a medium mixing bowl.
  2. Add the water, whisking until completely blended. Let the batter stand for 2 to 3 minutes to thicken. The batter should be the consistency of a thin pancake batter to make tortillas that are akin to traditional flour tortillas. Add a bit more water, if needed.
  3. Heat a medium size nonstick skillet over medium heat until just hot.
  4. Add about 1/4 cup of the batter to the heated skillet. Working quickly, tilt the skillet so that the batter evenly covers the bottom of the skillet.
  5. Increase the heat to medium-high and cook the tortilla for 1 to 2 minutes until the edges are light golden brown, and the surface appears cooked/ just dry. Slide a spatula underneath and flip over. Cook for about 1 minute longer until just set.
  6. Transfer the tortilla to a cooling rack to cool and repeat with the remaining batter. Use as you would any other tortilla!

Notes

Storage: Store the tortillas in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or the freezer for up to 6 months. To prevent sticking during storage, I suggest layering the tortillas between pieces of wax paper or parchment paper.

Quinoa Variation: An equal amount of quinoa flour can be used in place of the amaranth flour.

Using Whole Grain Amaranth: You use an equal weight (140 grams--about 3/4 cup, plus 1 teaspoon) of uncooked amaranth grains, in place of the flour, in one of two ways:

  1. Grind the amaranth into a flour. Grind an equal weight of the uncooked amaranth in a high speed blender or coffee milll until it is a fine flour. Use in the recipe as directed.
  2. Soak and blend the amaranth. Soak an equal weight of whole grain amaranth in boiling water for 15 minutes, or room temperature water for 3 hours. Drain through a fine mesh sieve. Combine the soaked amaranth with 1 cup water in a blender and blend until completely smooth.
Nutrition Information
Yield 6 Serving Size 1
Amount Per Serving Calories 81Total Fat 2gSaturated Fat 0gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 1gCholesterol 0mgSodium 4mgCarbohydrates 13gFiber 1gSugar 0gProtein 3g

The nutritional information is provided as a courtesy and is an estimate only. This information comes from online calculators. Although powerhungry.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures are only estimates. Varying factors such as product types or brands and optional ingredients can change the nutritional information in any given recipe.

Did you make this recipe?

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Joseph

Friday 8th of September 2023

Hey, could I soak whole quinoa in just the perfect ratio of water so that it does not have to be drained? (Like your red lentil tortillas) I don't like to drain things if it can be avoided. Thank you!

Camilla

Tuesday 12th of September 2023

Sure Joseph, you could do that. Just add the amount in the recipe, blend after soaking. I still suggest rinsing, though, if you can— the saponins (natural coating on quinoa) can taste bitter. Rinsing can help remove any bitterness (piss soaking).

Jenn

Thursday 7th of September 2023

These came out so good— sort of a crepe and tortilla all in one. Thank you!

Camilla

Thursday 14th of September 2023

So glad you like them, Jenn!

Joseph

Thursday 7th of September 2023

Hey, I was wondering if I could soak whole quinoa in just the right amount of liquid so I would not have to drain it. (like your red lentil tortillas) I don't like to drain anything if possible, thank you!

Camilla

Thursday 21st of September 2023

Hi Joseph,

Sure, that should work. A benefit of rinsing and draining quinoa, however, is to remove the slightly bitter saponins that coat the grain. Cheers.

Maggie

Thursday 13th of July 2023

You guys rock. I so appreciate all your good work creating all these great plant based gluten free recipes. Makes eating this way so enjoyable ????????

Camilla

Friday 14th of July 2023

Thanks so much, Maggie! It's a one woman show here at powerhungry, so that means so much!

Paty Shaulis

Monday 10th of July 2023

Hello! What type of non-stick skillet do you use? I make all my own tortillas on a cast iron skillet because I stay away from Teflon. I imagine these would stick to the cast iron? I would hate to waste a batch of amaranth if you think they would stick. Thank you for all the recipes you share!

Paty Shaulis

Monday 17th of July 2023

@Camilla, thank you! I will try it on the cast iron or check out ceramic non-stick!

Camilla

Tuesday 11th of July 2023

Hi Paty,

A well seasoned cast iron should work if you have used it for other nonstick items like this in the past. I use my cast iron for some flatbreads, but now I use a ceramic nonstick pan for poured tortillas a crepes. Number of Teflon -free nonstick pans are available now (yay). I like ceramic nonstick best.

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