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Homemade Pumpkin Seed Flour (aka Pepita Flour)

Homemade pumpkin seed flour (aka pepita flour) is a nutrient-dense, gluten-free, grain-free flour that can be used in all kinds of recipes. Use it as a nut-free, less expensive alternative to almond flour and other nut flours.

close up of a bowl of homemade pumpkin seed flour

Pumpkin Seed Flour in Place of Almond Flour

Almond flour, hazelnut flour, and other nut flours, are delicious when used in a wide range of baked goods (cookies, cakes, or breads, anyone?). They are particularly appealing for anyone seeking gluten-free, grain-free baking options

But as I mentioned in my post about making your own sunflower seed flour, almond flour has two major limitations:

  1. It cannot be used by anyone with nut allergies or nut sensitivities.
  2. It is expensive.

Pumpkin seed flour solves both problems in one fell swoop!

What is Pumpkin Seed Flour (Pepita Flour)?

Pumpkin seed flour is a fine-textured flour made with the raw pumpkin seeds (also known as pepitas). The outer shell of pepitas is green. Nut-free, gluten-free and grain-free, pumpkin seed flour has a neutral, mildly nutty flavor that can be used in a wide range of recipes.

Seed flours, such as pumpkin seed flour, sesame seed flour, and sunflower seed flour, are not as common as other grain-free flours, such as coconut flour and almond flour. This is largely because such flour options have not been available for purchase as ready-made products.

That is changing. Several brands of pumpkin seed flour, for example, have come to market in recent years, and pumpkin seed flour is appearing in a growing number of recipes and healthy prepared foods.

The time for pumpkin seed flour is her, and I am excited to show you how to make it, and also how to use it in a variety of easy recipes

But forget about waiting for bags of it to show up in stores. You can make it with ease, and at a very low cost!

Pumpkin Seed Flour Benefits

  • Grain-free
  • Gluten-free
  • High in protein
  • High in fiber
  • Rich in healthy fats
  • One of the best natural sources of magnesium (great for maintaining healthy bones)
  • Rich source of antioxidants

Are Pumpkin Seed Powder and Pumpkin Seed Flour the Same Thing?

wooden bowl filled with pumpkin seed powder

In most instances, the answer is no. Products labeled as “pumpkin seed powder” may contain multiple ingredients (not just pumpkin seeds), or may only contain an extraction or derivative of pumpkin seeds (for example, the fat and/or fiber may be removed).

Further, pumpkin seed powder, as opposed to flour (or meal) may be completely pulverized into a consistency similar to starch flour (e.g., cornstarch or tapioca flour). As such, it will not work as needed in baking recipes as an alternative to almond flour, or other nut flours.

It is best to make homemade pumpkin seed flour, from whole green pumpkin seeds (pepitas), to ensure the singularity of ingredients and the correct grind.

How to Make Your Own Pumpkin Seed Flour (aka Pepita Flour)

Making your own flour, of any kind, may sound daunting if it is a brand new to you. Rest assured: making flour from raw, green, dry pumpkin seeds is both fast and easy.

With the following items, you can make a batch in under 5 minutes from start to finish:

Tip: If you have severe nut allergies, make sure that the pumpkin seeds you purchase are processed in a nut-free facility. 

overhead photo of a wooden bowl filled with raw green pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

How to Make Homemade Pumpkin Seed Flour (aka Pepita Flour)

Note that the complete directions are also in the recipe card below.

Step 1: Place the raw pumpkin seeds (pepitas) in a blender or coffee grinder

Place all of the raw pumpkin seeds (raw pepitas) in the container if you are using a high-speed blender. If using a coffee grinder, you will need to work in batches. I recommend grinding 1/3 cup (about 41 grams) at a time.

If I am using my large blender, I typically make more flour at one time (adding more seeds to the blender). For 1 cup batches, I use my high speed bullet blender.

pepitas in a bullet style blender

Step 2: Process the seeds until finely ground

Let the grinding begin! For greater control, and to avoid making pumpkin seed seed butter (which you definitely can make! See my easy DIY pumpkin seed butter recipe), I recommend pulsing rather than letting it rip without pause.

Begin with 30 seconds of processing. Stop and scrape down the container. Process again, stopping intermittently, until the you have what looks like a fine flour, with a few larger pieces of seeds throughout.

If you are using a coffee grinder, I suggest shaking the grinder as you process (an old trick I learned from my days working in a coffee store). This keeps the seeds flowing freely without clumping. Music is optional!

Step 3: Sift the flour to remove the larger bits

Lastly, sift the finely ground pumpkin seeds through a fine mesh sieve to remove any large bits (you can reprocess the seeds until fine).

2 photo collage showing how to sift pumpkin seed flour

If you do not mind some larger pieces in your flour, you can skip this step (especially for more rustic creations). But for all-purpose use, I strongly recommend a thorough sifting. To speed the sifting, I stir the flour around to help push it through.

mesh sieve with large pieces of unground pumpkin seeds

A large sieve makes sifting simple. If you do not have a sieve, you can acquire one for cheap. The one pictured above is from the dollar store (cost: $1.25).

You did it! You just made pumpkin seed flour!

pepita flour in a wooden bowl

Pumpkin Seed Flour Yield

One hundred fifty (150) grams (roughly 1 cup) of green pumpkin seeds (pepitas) yields 1 and 1/4 cups of pumpkin seed flour. This equals ten 2 tablespoon servings.

How to Use Pumpkin Seed Flour

Use your pumpkin seed flour right away, or store it for future uses. Here are the primary ways it can be used.

1. Pumpkin Seed Flour in Place of Almond Flour and other Nut Flours

In general, pumpkin seed flour can be used as a 1:1 replacement for almond flour or almond meal. I strongly urge weighing the flour with a kitchen scale for an exact weight replacement (and, hence, the most accurate results).

2. Pumpkin Seed Flour as Protein Powder

Add pumpkin seed flour to your favorite smoothies, nutrition shakes, morning oatmeal, and more for a boost of protein (plus the many benefits listed previously).

FAQ

How Should I Store Pumpkin Seed Flour?

Store the pumpkin seed flour in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer for up to 6 months.

What is the Flavor of Pumpkin Seed Flour?

Pumpkin seed flour has a neutral, nutty flavor that taste wonderful in a wide range of recipes, or as an add-in to smoothies and oatmeal.

Can I Use a Coffee Grinder to Make Homemade Pumpkin Seed Flour?

Yes, definitely. For best results, fill the grinder with no more than 1/4 to 1/3 cup of pumpkin seeds (pepitas) at a time.

Further, if you use your coffee grinder for coffee (in addition to grinding nuts and seeds for your recipes! :)), be sure to wipe it out to remove any traces of coffee and coffee oil. You can pulse a bit of bread in the grinder to remove any final traces (discard the bread afterwards). For more even grinding, I recommend shaking the grinder as you grind the seeds.

Can a Food Processor Work to Grind the Pumpkin Seeds (pepitas) into Pumpkin Seed Flour?

No. A food processor will not grind the seeds into a a fine flour (only a coarse meal).

close up of a bowl of homemade pumpkin seed flour

Homemade Pumpkin Seed Flour (Pepita Flour)

Yield: 1 and 1/4 cups flour
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Pumpkin seed flour (also known as pepita flour) is a nutrient-dense, gluten-free, grain-free flour that can be used in all kinds of recipes. Use it as a nut-free, less expensive alternative to almond flour and other nut flours.

Ingredients

  • 150 grams (roughly 1 cup) green pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

Instructions

    1. Place the green pumpkin seeds in a high speed blender (a high speed bullet blender is ideal). If using a coffee grinder, only grind 1/3 cup or 1/2 cup at a time.
    2. Process for 30 seconds. Scrape down sides repeat, until the seeds resemble a mostly fine flour with some larger pieces throughout (avoid over-processing--the flour will turn into seed butter).
    3. Transfer the flour to a mesh sieve set over a bowl. Sift the flour to remove any of the large pieces (stir it around to force it through the sieve). Reprocess the large pieces to a fine flour and sift again.

Notes

Storage: Store the pumpkin seed flour in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer for up to 6 months.
Coffee Grinder Tips: If you use your coffee grinder for coffee, too, be sure to wipe it out to remove any traces of coffee and coffee oil. You can pulse a bit of bread in the grinder to remove any final traces (discard the bread afterwards). For more even grinding, I recommend shaking the grinder as you grind the seeds.

Nutrition Information
Yield 10 Serving Size 2 tablespoons (15 g)
Amount Per Serving Calories 86Total Fat 7gSaturated Fat 1gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 5gCholesterol 0mgSodium 3mgCarbohydrates 2gFiber 1gSugar 0gProtein 4g

The nutritional information is provided as a courtesy and is an estimate only. This information comes from online calculators. Although powerhungry.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures are only estimates. Varying factors such as product types or brands and optional ingredients can change the nutritional information in any given recipe.

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Carol

Thursday 7th of December 2023

Can I use roasted pumpkin seeds?

Camilla

Monday 11th of December 2023

Hi Carol, YES! I accidentally ordered roasted pepitas just a few weeks ago and used them to make the flour, and several recipes for friends with allergies. It came out great. Just take care when grinding (stop and scrape, let the machine cool, if needed) to avoid making pepita butter (not a bad thing! But not when you are aiming for flour). I found that the oils in the roasted pepitas release a little bit more quickly than the raw, so I had to be a touch more patient (by a minute or two) while grinding.

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