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Vegan Coconut Flour Flax Bread

Bake the BEST loaf of gluten-free, vegan bread with ease, minimal cost, and incredible results! My vegan coconut flour flax bread has a soft, tender, 100% BREAD texture (like a soft wheat bread). It is also oil-free, yeast-free, and sugar-free.

overhead shot of a loaf of coconut flour flax bread on a wood cutting board with a colorful napkin underneath

The Best Vegan Grain-Free Gluten-Free Bread

No more making do with gluten-free, vegan loaves of bread that are acceptable, at best.

Instead, make a loaf that will dazzle, amaze, and delight you. I mean it. This humble, yet beautiful, loaf of bread is destined to be your go-to bread. It is just that good GREAT!

This satisfying loaf is also a breeze to mix and shape (about 5 minutes of effort) and requires zero previous baking experience. And, keeping in the tradition of classic bread making, this is a frugal loaf with minimal ingredients, so you can make it day in and day out without breaking the bank.

It is the BEST!

slices of coconut flour flax bread on a wood cutting board

Recipe Benefits

Here are more reasons to make a loaf of vegan coconut flour flax bread as soon as possible. It is:

  • Vegan (no eggs, no dairy)
  • Grain-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Oil-free
  • Nut-free
  • Yeast-free
  • Sugar-free
  • High in fiber (5 grams per slice)
  • Quick & easy (one bowl and about 5 minutes total prep time)
  • Made with 5 ingredients (plus water & optional salt)

The bread slices like a dream (thick or thin) and makes great toast, too.

Ingredients for the Vegan Coconut Flour Flax Bread

The exact amounts of each ingredient are indicated in the recipe card at the end of the post.

Glass bowls filled with coconut flour flax bread ingredients

The ingredients for this loaf are minimal, and frugal, too. Here is what you will need:

  • Coconut Flour: A delicately sweet gluten-free flour that can be used in a range of recipes (baking and beyond). It is the coconut fiber that remains after coconut milk extraction (it is then dried and ground), hence it has very little fat.
  • Flaxseed Meal: Use any variety of flaxseed meal you like. Golden flaxseed meal will produce a lighter-colored and lighter-flavored loaf than darker (regular) flaxseed meal. The flavor of the flax is balanced by the neutral, faintly sweet flavor of the coconut flour.
  • Baking Soda: Make sure to use baking soda , not baking powder (they have very different strengths; the bread will not rise well with an equal amount of baking powder). If you need the fo
  • Whole Psyllium Husks: These are the outer layer of psyllium seeds (from the psyllium plant). They are extremely absorbent and create a gel when combined with water. They work wonders in providing critical structure to egg-free, grain-free breads such as this one.
  • Cider Vinegar: I use apple cider vinegar, but any light colored vinegar will work. Alternatively, use an equal amount of lemon juice.

You will also need some regular tap water. I like to add salt to the dough (1/8 teaspoon is just right for me), but it is optional (and/or adjustable to your needs and tastes).

Double Grind the Flax for an Extra-Fine Textured Loaf

Flaxseed meal is exactly that: a rough meal made by grinding whole flax seeds to an irregular consistency. It gives this loaf a wholesome texture reminiscent of whole wheat bread.

Creating a finer-textured loaf is easy: give the flaxseed meal an extra grind in high speed blender or a clean coffee mill. Grind the meal until it is light, fluffy, and even-textured.

Measure the amount of flaxseed meal needed for the recipe BEFORE grinding if using cup measures (the flaxseed meal will increase in volume after grinding). The best way to measure is with a digital kitchen scale.

Do not skip this step. It may sound like a frivolous, but the bread will not work correctly unless the fax is finely ground into a flour

2 bowls of golden flaxseed meal. One is meal from the bag, the other is meal that has been finely ground.

Step by Step Instructions

Step One: Prep the Oven & Baking Pan

Before mixing the dough, preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Alternatively, spray the baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.

Step Two: Whisk the Dry Ingredients

In a medium or large mixing bowl, whisk the flaxseed meal, coconut flour, whole psyllium husks, and baking soda until blended. If using salt, whisk it in as well.

overhead shot of a glass bowl filled with the dry ingredients for coconut flour flax bread

Step Three: Mix in the Wet Ingredients

Add the water and vinegar to the dry ingredients in the bowl. Using a rubber/silicone spatula or a wooden spoon, mix until completely combined.

This is a very thick dough. You will need to stir thoroughly to combine all of the ingredients into a cohesive dough. Avoid the temptation to add more water. Extra water will lead to a gooey loaf.

bowl of dough for coconut flour flax bread

Step Four: Shape Into a Loaf

Unbaked dough for coconut flour flax bread on a parchment lined baking sheet

Use your hands to press and shape the dough into a smooth, even ball. Place on the prepared baking sheet and gently roll and press to a rounded, oblong loaf with the following dimensions:

  • Length: About 8 inches (20 cm)
  • Width: About 3.5 inches (8.75 cm)
  • Height: About 1.5 to 2 inches (3.75 to 5 cm)

Using a sharp knife, make at least 3 slashes across the top of the bread (about 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thickness). This allows for the release of steam as the bread bakes.

Unbaked coconut flour flax bread with several slashes being made with a knife

Step Five: Bake

Bake the bread in the preheated oven for 75 to 80 minutes, or until the surface of the dough looks dry and the loaf is is deep golden brown (it will be less dark if using golden flaxseed meal).

Coconut flour flax bread on a parchment lined baking sheet.

Remove the bread from the oven and cool for 10 minutes on the baking sheet.

After 10 minutes, carefully slide the loaf onto a large cooling rack to cool completely. Isn’t this a pretty loaf?

Coconut flour flax bread on a wire cooling rack

The bread has a modest, but noticeable rise. The slashes will open up, making for an artisanal-looking loaf.

Slice & Savor

Transfer the bread to a cutting board and slice it, as thick or as thin as you like! I typically cut the loaf into about 14 thick slices, but cut it any which way you like.

loaf of coconut flour flax bread on a wood cutting board, with several slices cut off

What is the Taste & Texture of the Bread?

It is the taste and texture of this bread that make it stellar.

The flavor is neutral but wholesome, like a light whole wheat bread. It also has a hint of sweetness from the coconut flour. The texture is tender and fluffy, and unmistakably BREADY. This is no ersatz loaf. It is 100% bread 😊.

How to Serve Vegan Coconut Flour Flax Bread

Consider this your go-to, go-with-everything bread. It is the bread you will reach for at breakfast (as toast, with toppings, or alongside a vegan scramble), to make sandwiches at lunchtime, or to pair with any and all entrees come dinner time.

Don’t forget about between-meal gnashing: a single slice is satisfying, energizing, and (most importantly) delicious, plain or topped with jam, nut butters, hummus, or you name it.

FAQ & Tips

  • Preheat the Oven: Make sure that the oven is completely preheated to 350F (180C) before mixing up the bread dough. It will take 10 to 15 minutes to preheat your oven, but only 5 minutes to mix and shape the dough.
  • Measure the Flour with Care: The best way to measure flour is to lightly spoon it into measuring cups (do not pack the flour). For the greatest accuracy, using a digital kitchen scale to measure (I have the weight, in grams, in the recipe card below).
  • Follow the Recipe as Written: This recipe took at least a dozen rounds of testing, with varying ingredients and quantities, to get right. The final recipe is very simple to follow, but the instructions must be followed, as written, for the best results.

Can I Use Other Ingredients in Place of Coconut Flour & Flax?

No, neither the coconut flour nor flaxseed meal can be replaced with any other ingredients; the recipe will not work.

Coconut flour is used in substantially different quantities compared to just about every other flour (gluten-free or otherwise). It also has many idiosyncrasies, so it is best to stay with the ingredients as specified.

Can I Use Something Other than Whole Psyllium Husks?

Update 11/11/21: No, there are no substitutes for the whole psyllium husks.

I previously suggested that psyllium powder might work as a substitute for whole psyllium husks, but two readers immediately reported problems with the bread when using the powder. I do not use psyllium powder, but decided I needed to try it myself. The psyllium powder did not work. Please use whole psyllium husks.

My Bread Came out Gooey. Why?

The number one reason is this: the flaxseed meal was not ground into a fine flour, as instructed. The bread will definitely come out gooey if this step is not followed.

Can I Make the Dough in Advance?

I do not recommend it. The baking soda will lose its potency if the dough is made too far in advance. The dough comes together very quickly, so there really is no advantage to making the dough ahead of time.

How Should I Store the Vegan Coconut Flour Flax Bread?

The bread can be stored in an airtight container at cool room temperature for 2 days, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or the freezer for up to 3 months.

Happy Baking!

Yield: 1 8-inch (20 cm) loaf of bread

Vegan Coconut Flour Flax Bread {oil-free, gluten-free, grain-free}

overhead shot of a loaf of coconut flour flax bread on a wood cutting board with a colorful napkin underneath

Bake the BEST loaf of gluten-free, vegan bread with ease, minimal cost, and incredible results! My vegan coconut flour flax bread has a soft, tender, 100% BREAD texture (like a soft wheat bread). It is also oil-free, yeast-free, and sugar-free.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 and 3/4 cups (182 g) flaxseed meal
  • 1/2 cup (56 g) coconut flour
  • 2 tablespoons (10 g) whole psyllium husks (do not use powder)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • Optional: 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 and 1/2 cups (355 mL) water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 mL) cider vinegar

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper (or lightly spray with nonstick cooking spray).
  2. In a blender or clean coffee mill, grind the flaxseed meal into a fine flour. Do not skip this step--the bread will be gooey unless this step is followed.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk the finely ground flaxseed flour, coconut flour, whole psyllium husks, baking soda, and (optional) salt until blended.
  4. Add the water and vinegar to the bowl and stir until completely blended. The dough is stiff but moist--do not add more water to make it easier to stir.
  5. Use your hands to shape the dough into a compact ball. Place on the prepared baking sheet and shape into a smooth, even, oblong loaf measuring 8 inches long, 3.5 inches wide, and 1.5 to 2 inches high.
  6. Using a sharp knife, make at least 3 large diagonal slashes across the top of the dough (at least 1/4 inch deep).
  7. Bake in the preheated oven for 75 to 80 minutes until the loaf appears dry and deep golden brown.
  8. Remove the bread from the oven and cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes. Carefully slide the loaf onto a cooling rack and cool completely.
  9. Slice as desired!

Notes

Storage: The bread can be stored in an airtight container at cool room temperature for 2 days, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or the freezer for up to 3 months.

UPDATE--Pysllium Powder Option: I previousl suggested subbing psyllium powder for the whole psyllium husks. I have since tested with the powder and it does not work. Please use whole psyllium husks.

Nutrition Information

Yield

14

Serving Size

1

Amount Per Serving Calories 96Total Fat 6gSaturated Fat 1gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 5gCholesterol 0mgSodium 96mgCarbohydrates 8gFiber 5gSugar 1gProtein 4g

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @powerhungrycamilla on Instagram and hashtag it #powerhungrycamilla

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Diane

Thursday 8th of September 2022

Hi Camilla. I have a question for you, but first, I must say that you're a genius. I've successfully made 3 of your WFPB GF-OF breads and a couple of other recipes as well and have several more in queue to try. Thank you for sharing your wisdom.

I did run into trouble with this bread and I'm thinking it's because I used Trader Joe's flaxmeal that I've kept in the freezer. (Freezing it has never been a problem in the past for other recipes.) I'm wondering if you're familiar with an issue caused by freezing and if next time I just leave that out for a day in advance - would it return to "working order"? What happened is it basically wouldn't grind into flour. I have a Vitamix so I don't think it's a blender issue. It kept gumming up at the bottom under and around the blade even though I only put about 1/3 of the volume in at one time. I tried to fix it by adding some of the coconut flour at the same time (thinking it would dry out any excess moisture). It didn't really help. I went ahead and made the bread anyway. The top half was basically empty and the bottom half was dense and very slightly gooey. The consistency was wrong prior to baking as well - not stiff. The bottom half did have a good taste to it and that's why I'm hoping to find a fix.

Thank you!

Diane

Tuesday 13th of September 2022

@Camilla,

Thank you so much for taking the time to consider my problem and to get back to me with clear guidance. I wouldn't have come up with that answer in a million years! I'll definitely try it again and I'll let you know how it goes.

My hubby and I just finished enjoying burgers made from your Vegan Mushroom Almond Ground Beef. I'll comment on that page, but it's further proof to me that if a recipe is preceded with "powerhungry.com", it's going to be a hit!

Thanks for all of your help! Diane

Camilla

Monday 12th of September 2022

Hi Diane! I am so happy you are enjoying the wfpb bread recipes!

Thanks for the detailed description of how you made the coconut flax bread because it allows me to determine the problem. It is not the freezing of the flaxseed. I am also 100% certain that it is the volume of flaxseed meal you were grinding. A small amount at a time works for a coffee grinder (which only holds about 1/4 cup at a time). But for a high speed blender, add ALL of the flaxseed meal at once (as opposed to 1/3 of it at a time). The blender will be able to convert it into flax flour in about 10-15 seconds because of the volume in the blender. With only a small volume of flaxseed meal at a time, the blender will end up turning the flaxseed meal into a paste (the oils will release, just like making peanut butter or sunflower seed butter in a Vitamix). Once that happens, the results will not work in this bread (which absolutely positively needs to be made with a light, fluffy, still dry--not pasty/gummy--flour).

I really hope that you give it another go Diane--I predict that you will nail it :). And thanks again for writing, as I am sure this will help other bakers.

Gabriele

Wednesday 20th of July 2022

Hi there, I forgot to make slashes, could that be a reason why the bread is very dense? Taste is prety ok though :)

Camilla

Thursday 15th of September 2022

That is likely, yes. The slashes allow the steam to escape.

Carol

Thursday 26th of May 2022

I made this recipe and it turned out dry. I used flax seed meal and did NOT grind extra in my seed grinder because the flax meal I used was already a fine texture. I think it would have made great crackers and it needed more salt.

Camilla

Tuesday 7th of June 2022

Hi Carol, it sounds like there may have been too much flax or flour in the recipe. Just checking if you weighed the flour and flax? Or did you use cups? It is really easy to overmeasure the coconut flour, in particular. I am really keen on weighing flours, especially non traditional ones like coconut flour.

I know it sounds odd, but the extra grinding of the flaxseed meal is really important. Even if the flaxseed meal is finely ground, it is still meal. The extra grinding transforms the meal into a superfine flour, which is critical for the success of the bread.

Carol

Thursday 26th of May 2022

I would like to see this recipe made with sorghum flour instead of flax meal. Have you tried that?

Camilla

Tuesday 7th of June 2022

Hi Carol, I have used sorghum flour in combination with other grain flours--I don't think it would provide enough structure (it is a very soft flour) when combined with coconut flour (coconut flour needs to be combined with ingredients that offer structure, especially with a vegan recipe)..

Nadeen

Monday 23rd of May 2022

Hey, Thankyou for sharing your recipe 🤍✨ Is it possible to skip the baking soda/powder or substitute?x

Camilla

Tuesday 7th of June 2022

Hi Nadeen! The bread needs to have some sort of leavened to make it rise (baking soda or baking powder). The only other alternative are yeast or eggs. If you eat eggs, you could experiment with replacing some of the liquid with beaten eggs or egg white to make the bread rise. I have not done any experimenting with yeast in coconut flour or flax breads so I cannot recommend amounts or how that might work.Sorry.

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