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Easy No-Roll Cassava Flour Crackers (V, Grain-Free, 2 ingredients)

Easy no-roll cassava flour crackers, made with 2 ingredients (plus water & optional salt).They are vegan, grain-free, gluten-free, and super simple to make in little time.

close up of cassava flour crackers in a white dish atop a floral napkin

Easy Grain-Free No-Roll Crackers

Crisp, crunchy crackers that are vegan, grain-free, gluten-free and made without rolling dough? That is exactly what my easy no-roll cassava flour crackers have to offer.

If you have 30 seconds to whisk the batter, and a minute to spread it on a baking sheet, you have time to make a batch of these delicious crackers!

overhead shot of cassava flour crackers in a white dish

Recipe Benefits

My easy no-roll cassava flour crackers are:

  • Made with 2 ingredients (plus water & optional salt)
  • Vegan (egg-free & dairy-free)
  • Grain-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Sugar-free
  • Paleo
  • Quick & easy to make in one bowl
  • Frugal
  • Made without rolling dough (simply spread the batter)
  • Customizable (add in, or top with, extra ingredients)

They are seriously good!

close up of a cassava cracker with hummus on one end

Ingredients for the Cassava Flour Crackers

The exact amounts of each ingredient are indicated in the recipe card at the end of the post.

To make the crackers, you will need:

  • Cassava flour (not to be confused with tapioca flour or tapioca starch)
  • Neutral vegetable oil (e.g., avocado oil, olive oil, safflower oil)

You will also need regular tap water. I recommend adding salt, as well (I have specific amount recommendations in the recipe card, below), but it is entirely optional/adjustable.

You can flavor the crackers in many ways, too. I have a host of suggestions in the FAQ section at the end of the post.

ingredient for cassava flour crackers in glass bowls

What is Cassava Flour?

You may be brand new to using cassava flour. It is well worth knowing!

Cassava flour is a grain-free, gluten-free flour made from cassava (yuca root). Yuca root/ cassava is a starchy tuberous root commonly found in South American, African, and Asian cuisines. Tapioca is another product made from cassava.

Cassava flour is made by peeling, drying, and pulverizing the whole yuca root. Like wheat flour, it has a neutral flavor, which makes it wonderful to use in grain-free and gluten-free baking.

Important Tip for Measuring Cassava Flour

measuring cup filled with cassava flour

For best results, measure cassava flour by weight rather than cups.

Here’s why.

Cassava flour is tough to measure in standard cup measurements because it is so darn powdery (think talcum powder flying all over every surface consistency). It compacts even when lightly spooned into measuring cups. Thanks, cassava flour.

Moreover, what constitutes 1/4 cup of cassava flour varies from one manufacturer to another. Looking at 5 different brands (Bob’s Red Mill, Thrive, Otto’s, Terrasoul and Anthony’s) , the measurement for 1/4 cup of flour on the nutrition labels ranges from 30 grams to 35 grams (2 bags list 30 g, 2 bags 32 g, 1 bag at 35 g).

In the world of baking, that is huge difference that can create dramatically different results. Based on the different brands, a standard cup of cassava flour can vary from 120 grams to 140 grams!

If cassava flour was not so great for baking, I would say forget it. But it is, so carry on with these tips in mind:

  • 1/4 cup of cassava flour is 32 grams (1 cup = 128 grams; middle ground of the various brands)
  • If using a cup measure, do not fill to the top of the cup! 
  • For greatest accuracy, use a digital kitchen scale to measure

Step by Step Instructions

Time to make some crackers, friends!

Step One: Preheat the Oven & Prep a Baking Sheet

Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper (it works better than spraying the pan or greasing the pan).

The large baking sheet I use (day in and day out) is a standard half sheet pan, which is a heavy pan measuring 18 x 13 inches (45 x 32.5 cm).

If your pan is smaller than a half sheet pan, your crackers will be thicker and will need a longer bake. If needed, divide the batter into several smaller metal pans (e.g., cake pans, square pans).

Step Two: Whisk the Batter

In a medium bowl, whisk the cassava flour, water, oil and optional salt. That was easy!

The thickness of the batter should be right in between the thickness of pancake batter and crepe batter In other words, Goldilocks thickness: not too thick, not too thin.

No need to panic if the batter is too thick or thin: simply add more water, or a small amount more cassava flour, as needed.

glass bowl on marble countertop, with bowl filled with cassava flour cracker batter

Step Three: Spread the No-Roll Cassava Flour Cracker Batter

Pour all of the no-roll cassava flour cracker batter onto the prepared baking sheet.

a puddle of cassava flour cracker batter on baking sheet

Use a spatula to spread the batter into an even layer that covers almost all of the parchment paper.

An offset spatula works especially well for spreading the batter. if you have one, use it. Otherwise, a regular silicone spatula, or even the back of a large spoon, will work fine.

cassava flour batter spread onto a parchment lined baking sheet

Step Four: Bake for 20 Minutes

Bake the crackers in the preheated oven for 20 minutes.

Remove the baking sheet from the oven (keep the oven on). Using a pizza cutter, knife, or a metal pastry cutter, cut the crackers into squares (or whatever shape you desire). I cut mine into 10 x 7 rows for 70 crackers.

It is not difficult to cut through the crackers. Moreover, it is not necessary to cut all the way through. So long as the crackers are at least deeply scored (i.e., cut part-way through), they will break off with ease post-bake.

As you can see from my photo, I did not worry about cutting perfect shapes :). You should not, either.

cassava flour crackers on a baking sheet being cut with a pizza cutter

Step Five: Return Crackers to the Oven

Return the cut crackers to the oven and bake for another 25 to 30 minutes until light golden brown and crispy (they will look dry, and also feel firm to the touch).

Begin checking for doneness at the 25 minute mark.

The crackers on the outer edge of the sheet pan tend to brown more quickly than the crackers towards the center. Break off (at the cut lines) any crackers that are already golden brown and crisp t(transfer to a cooling rack or plate). If any crackers need an additional few minutes of baking, keep them on the baking sheet and return to the oven until they are similarly crisp and golden brown.

Step Six: Cool the Cassava Crackers

Use the parchment paper to remove the crackers to a cooling rack or cutting board and cool completely. Break the crackers along their cut lines.

baked cassava flour crackers on a parchment lined baking sheet.

Taste & Texture of No-Roll Cassava Flour Crackers

The flavor of the crackers is remarkably similar to crackers made with all-purpose flour. It makes them perfect for general munching, or for pairing with a bowl of soup, dunking into a favorite dip, or pairing with a favorite cheese. I strongly recommend my so-easy Cashew Boursin (spreadable garlic-herb cheese). It’s a match made in heaven).

The crackers have a sturdy, crunchy texture–they are very satisfying when you are in need of a salty snack.

cassava crackers dipped in a bowl of hummus

FAQ

How Should the No-Roll Cassava Flour Crackers be Stored?

Store the cooled crackers in an airtight container at cool room temperature for 2 weeks or the freezer for up to 6 months.

Can I Flavor the No-Roll Cassava Flour Crackers?

Yes!

(1) Add Herbs or Spices to the Batter

Whisk your favorite herbs or spices directly into the batter. About one to one and a half teaspoons for most dried herbs and spices, for this quantity of batter, is a good general guesstimate.

Fresh chopped herbs can also be added to the batter. Add up to two tablespoons of mild herbs, such as parsley, cilantro, or basil. For stronger herbs, such as rosemary, oregano or thyme, add 1 to 2 teaspoons maximum.

(2) Flavor with Liquids and Pastes

Consider adding wet flavor enhancers, as well. For example:

  • Hot sauce
  • Curry paste
  • Tomato paste
  • Tomato juice (in place of the water)
  • Wasabi paste

(3) Sprinkle with Flavorful Toppings

You can also sprinkle toppings directly onto the batter after it has been spread out on the baking sheet. Some ideas include:

  • Seeds (e.g., sesame, poppy, sunflower)
  • Finely chopped nuts
  • Chopped dried onion
  • Everything bagel topping
  • Flaky sea salt
  • Cracked black pepper

Can These Be Made into Bigger Crackers?

Yes! You can cut the crackers any shape you like, and that includes cutting them into bigger sizes. The baking time stays relatively the same, so begin checking at the thirty minute mark on the second bake.

Is there a Way to Make These Crackers Even Crispier?

Yes! You can replace some of the water with additional oil. For every tablespoon of oil, reduce the water by 1 tablespoon.

Can I Use A Different Flour?

No, this recipe is specific to cassava flour so I cannot recommend any other flour as a replacement.

This includes tapioca starch/flour. Both cassava flour and tapioca are derived from the yuca (cassava) plant. However, the two products are processed differently and work in different ways in baking and other recipes.

Can I Make these Crackers Oil-Free?

I do not recommend it for this recipe.

You could replace the oil with more water (I have not tried it), but the crackers will not be crisp or tender. I suspect they would be fairly hard.

Another option could be to replace some of the water with a high fat liquid, such as full-fat coconut milk. I have not tried it, but it could be worth experimenting.

Yield: 70 crackers (about 1.5 inches)

Easy No-Roll Cassava Flour Crackers (vegan, grain-free)

overhead shot of cassava flour crackers in a white dish

Easy no-roll cassava flour crackers, made with 2 ingredients (plus water & optional salt).They are vegan, grain-free, gluten-free, and super simple to make in minutes.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 128 grams (a scant 1 cup) cassava flour
  • 1 cup (237 mL) water
  • 3 tablespoons neutral vegetable oil (e.g., avocado oil, olive oil)
  • Optional (but recommended): 1 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk the cassava flour, water, oil, and optional salt until smooth.
  3. Pour the batter onto the prepared baking sheet. Spread in an even layer to cover almost all of the parchment paper.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes. Remove the baking sheet from the oven. With a pizza cutter, knife, or metal pastry cutter, cut or score the crackers (I cut 10x7 rows).
  5. Return the baking sheet to the oven and bake for another 25 to 30 minutes until golden brown and crisp. If the crackers on the outer edge are darkening faster, break them off at the cut lines and cool; continue baking the remaining crackers until done.
  6. Use the parchment paper to remove the crackers to a cooling rack or cutting board. Cool completely and then break along the cut lines.

Notes

Storage: Store the cooled crackers in an airtight container at cool room temperature for 2 weeks or the freezer for up to 6 months.

Flavor variations: See the FAQ section in the post for ideas for adding herbs and spices to the batter, or sprinkling on toppings before baking.

Measuring Cassava Flour: See the blog post regarding measuring cassava flour. In general, 1 cup (148 g) is slightly less than a cup (since the flour compacts so much; it is very fine and light)

Nutrition Information

Yield

7 (10 crackers per serving)

Serving Size

1

Amount Per Serving Calories 86Total Fat 6gSaturated Fat 1gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 5gCholesterol 0mgSodium 3mgCarbohydrates 8gFiber 0gSugar 0gProtein 0g

Did you make this recipe?

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Betty

Tuesday 21st of June 2022

Which brand of cassava flour did you use for your crackers? None of them seem to have the amount per cup that you recommend.

Camilla

Thursday 23rd of June 2022

Apologies Betty, typo! It should have been 128 g for the 1 cup, not 148. Corrected.

Maaike

Monday 2nd of May 2022

I've tried to make this recipe, but when I follow it exactly I get a thick dough. I had to at least double the amount of water to make a batter. But they taste great!

Camilla

Wednesday 4th of May 2022

Hi Maaike! Oh no, so sorry you ended up with a dough instead of a batter. I am curious, did you weigh the flour or spoon it into cups? Cassava flour is so very powdery, it is extremely easy to add too much to a cup since it compacts so much.

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